In order to conduct specific research projects of importance to PIAA member companies, and to the providers they serve and the general public as well, the PIAA established the Physician Insurers Association of America Education and Research Foundation , Inc. (the Foundation), in 2002.  Principally, these projects focus on:

  • Ascertaining the root causes of medical injury within the various settings where healthcare is provided; and
  • Providing education for physicians, hospitals, healthcare providers, and the interested public, so that they are empowered to reduce the incidence of medical injury and increase the quality of the healthcare system.
The PIAA houses, in its Data Sharing Project (DSP), more than 250,000 closed MPL claims.  These detailed data can serve as one key resource for the unique research initiatives sponsored by the PIAA under the Foundation.   

By advancing the science of patient safety and quality healthcare, the Foundation serves to advance the cause of public health by providing accurate and timely research to healthcare stakeholders and policymakers.


Charter

The PIAA Foundation was chartered in the State of Maryland in 2002.  Its Board of Directors supervises, controls, and directs all of the affairs of this corporation.  It determines its specific policies within the limits established by its Articles of Incorporation, and the bylaws of the corporation.   It was established solely for the purposes of education and research, as those terms were defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, and thus meets the criteria for a Section 501( c )(3) (tax-exempt or “charitable”) organization.  

Research Projects

As noted above, some of the Foundation’s research is focused on concerns directly related to medical issues. For example, in the past, the PIAA has collaborated with the American College of Radiology and the American Cancer Society in studying the claims in its Data Sharing Project related to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

Other research may focus on the following:

  • How care is provided, and what might be done to improve it, in various medical settings, including hospitals and clinics.
  • Changes in the delivery of medicine in light of anticipated changes in the U.S. healthcare system.
  • Steps that can be taken to improve the medical liability system for the benefit of all parties potentially involved in MPL claims.